New Product
Jazz Lab Silencer Soundtraining for Saxophone and ClarinetJazz Lab Silencer Soundtraining for Saxophone and Clarinet

Mouthpiece exercises for woodwinds are one of the best methods to continually improve sound production. It is possible to train one's embouchure, breathing and articulation, optimally, via daily exercises - 5 minutes is enough. This is the key to better sound and intonation. Through mouthpiece exercises it is possible to train exactly those muscles that are crucial to the playing of a saxophone or a clarinet:
  1. for sound
  2. for intonation
  3. for special effects such as vibrato or bending
  4. for high tones

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The B.E.R.P. and why you need one...

The B.E.R.P. and why you need one...
How To BERP

The clamp: The Berp clamp fits firmly onto the open end of the instrument’s receiver, with the mouthpiece removed. It’s designed to tighten around a round, hex, or convex-shaped opening. If a receiver has an oversized ring at the opening, it may be necessary to push the clamp past that before tightening down. For some receivers, you may also need to add black electrical tape to the inside of the clamp to help prevent slippage and ensure a secure fit. Most people prefer to line The Berp up parallel to the receiver at the “three o’clock” position. You may want to experiment with other positions to determine what’s best for you. Once The Berp is firmly attached, you can easily alternate between buzzing and playing your instrument by switching the mouthpiece.

The Resistence Dial: The dial for the trumpet, horn, and cornet Berp should be positioned below the holes and pushed up to partially cover them to create the desired resistance. The dial on The Berp for trombones, euphoniums, and tubas should be positioned above the holes and lowered to create the desired resistance. Beginners usually have a better chance of getting a good buzz with slightly more resistance. Once a good buzz is achieved, resistance on The Berp should be dialed similarly to that of the instrument.
New Product
B.E.R.P. No 2 Cornet Buzz Extension Resistance PieceB.E.R.P. No 2 Cornet Buzz Extension Resistance Piece

The Berp comes from the concept of 'mouthpiece buzzing', which has been used as a teaching technique for brass players for many years. One of the leading proponents of buzzing was James Stamp, who had students add resistance to the mouthpiece when buzzing by either placing their little finger over the end or adding an alligator clip.

By learning to blow into resistance, students become more aware of undesirable resistance in their body, and learn how to avoid it by using proper breath support.

Fingering the instrument's valves - or moving the slide of a trombone - while buzzing the mouthpiece makes students aware of the connection between the fingers and the brain’s perception of pitch.

The BERP comes as a result of putting the two ideas together - buzzing while fingering to corresponding pitch - thus maximising the benefits for any brass instrument student.

Full instructions are included.

New Product
B.E.R.P. No 3 Trumpet Buzz Extension Resistance PieceB.E.R.P. No 3 Trumpet Buzz Extension Resistance Piece

The Berp comes from the concept of 'mouthpiece buzzing', which has been used as a teaching technique for brass players for many years. One of the leading proponents of buzzing was James Stamp, who had students add resistance to the mouthpiece when buzzing by either placing their little finger over the end or adding an alligator clip.

By learning to blow into resistance, students become more aware of undesirable resistance in their body, and learn how to avoid it by using proper breath support.

Fingering the instrument's valves - or moving the slide of a trombone - while buzzing the mouthpiece makes students aware of the connection between the fingers and the brain’s perception of pitch.

The BERP comes as a result of putting the two ideas together - buzzing while fingering to corresponding pitch - thus maximising the benefits for any brass instrument student.

Full instructions are included.

New Product
B.E.R.P. No 4 Trombone or Euphonium Buzz Extension Resistance PieceB.E.R.P. No 4 Trombone or Euphonium Buzz Extension Resistance Piece

The Berp comes from the concept of 'mouthpiece buzzing', which has been used as a teaching technique for brass players for many years. One of the leading proponents of buzzing was James Stamp, who had students add resistance to the mouthpiece when buzzing by either placing their little finger over the end or adding an alligator clip.

By learning to blow into resistance, students become more aware of undesirable resistance in their body, and learn how to avoid it by using proper breath support.

Fingering the instrument's valves - or moving the slide of a trombone - while buzzing the mouthpiece makes students aware of the connection between the fingers and the brain’s perception of pitch.

The BERP comes as a result of putting the two ideas together - buzzing while fingering to corresponding pitch - thus maximising the benefits for any brass instrument student.

Full instructions are included.

Methodical Practice Adapter for CornetMethodical Practice Adapter for Cornet

With this adaptor, the player can regulate the pressure on the lips. The pressure can be varied depending on the ability of the player. When too much pressure is used the spring mechanism collapses, allowing the air to escape. With regular practice the aim is to achieve the so called, "non pressure" embouchure. Precision engineered in Germany.

Methodical Practice Adaptor for TrumpetMethodical Practice Adaptor for Trumpet

With this adaptor, the player can regulate the pressure on the lips. The pressure can be varied depending on the ability of the player. When too much pressure is used the spring mechanism collapses, allowing the air to escape. With regular practice the aim is to achieve the so called, "non pressure" embouchure. Precision engineered in Germany.

Methodical Practice Adaptor for TromboneMethodical Practice Adaptor for Trombone

With this adaptor, the trombone player can regulate the pressure on the lips. The pressure can be varied depending on the ability of the player. When too much pressure is used the spring mechanism collapses, allowing the air to escape. With regular practice the aim is to achieve the so called, "non pressure" embouchure. Precision engineered in Germany.

The adapter is available for either tenor or bass trombone, the latter is an additional £4.50 (inc VAT).

Please select the adapter you require below.


Tenor trombone + £0.00 Bass Trombone + £4.50


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